1. Urban Fruit Trails: Week Two

    The class is making a cardboard set of the neighborhood and exchanging stories. They are learning how Urban Fruit Trail will transform their neighborhood. This artwork will become the background for the upcoming puppet show and music video.   

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  2. The Urban Fruit Trails youth are getting ready to bring fruit to the MacArthur Park community

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  3. Urban Fruit Trails: Week One

    Austin Young and David Burns of Fallen Fruit began their class this week with Fruit Machine. Stay tuned for the video!  

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    Here are some of the questions that the class explored:  What is your favorite Fruit?  What is your earliest memory of Fruit?  What is the most emotional fruit? What kind of Fruit would you be?  

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  5. Fallen Fruit begin 2014 Public Artist Residency

     
    Fallen Fruit is a collaborative art project that began in Los Angeles with creating maps of public fruit: the fruit trees growing on or over public property.   Fallen Fruit uses cartography and geography as an indexical platform to generate serialized and site-specific works of art that often embrace public participation.  The work of Fallen Fruit includes photographic portraits, experimental documentary videos, public art installations, and curatorial projects.  Using fruit as a method of reframing the familiar, Fallen Fruit investigates urban space, ideas of neighborhood, and new forms of citizenship.   From protests to proposals for new urban green space, Fallen Fruit’s work aims to reconfigure the relationship of sharing and explore understandings of public and private, as well as real world and real time.  We consider fruit to be many things; it’s a subject and object at the same time it is aesthetic.  Fruit often triggers a childhood memory;  it’s emotional and familiar.  Everyone is an expert on the flavor of a banana.  Much of this work is linked to ideas of place and family, and much of these works echo a sense of connectedness with something very primal – our capacity to share with others. Fallen Fruit is an art collaboration originally conceived in 2004 by David Burns, Matias Viegener and Austin Young. Since 2013, David and Austin have continued the collaborative work.  Fallen Fruit uses fruit as a common denominator to change the way you see the world.
  6. Two HOLA artists selected for the Hammer Museum’s Los Angeles Biennial

    Congrats to our 2013 public artist in residence, Mariah Garnett, and public art project collaborator, Sarah Rara.  We are lucky to get to work with such bright, talented artists.  

  7. We Are Talking Benches

    "Talking Benches," our 2012 public art installation, led by Pearl Hsiung and Anna Sew Hoy, is still up on display on local bus benches along Wilshire Boulevard and 6th Street (between LaFayette Park and MacArthur Park).

    A local blogger took notice of the benches and contacted HOLA to find out more. The result is this wonderful blog post on LA Streetsblog.org. 

  8. Watch this new video on Transforming the Everyday: An HOLA Public Art Project with Tanya Aguiñiga. 

  9. Want to learn more about Tanya Aguiñiga’s residency at HOLA?

    Click here to read more about Tanya Aguiñiga’s work at HOLA.  The HOLA youth and faculty are grateful for her many contributions to HOLA and one of the installations is still up in our gallery.  Tanya has been keeping busy with various with exhibitions, installations and new projects, but we look forward to working with her again in the near future.

  10. Check out this video from our Spring 2013 artist residency.

    SWAP/MEET is the culmination of a ten-week residency at HOLA by Los Angeles based artists Onya Hogan-Finlay & Mariah Garnett. Inspired by the Westlake Swapmeet, the students and the public traded what they have made at a simulated swap meet at the Levitt Pavilion in MacArthur Park. Throughout the residency HOLA art students activated public spaces in the neighborhood surrounding HOLA and examined the role of commerce and the public sphere in art. The students considered the definition of art, who an artist is and what role the artist has in society. Through a series of workshops led by visiting artists Fiona Connor, Andy Byers, Ramak Fazel, Karla Diaz and Mario Ybarra of Slanguage and Sonia Romero, the students explored a wide range of media and artistic approaches.